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SHIM: A Scheduling-Independent Concurrent Language for Embedded Systems
Stephen A. Edwards

Citation
Stephen A. Edwards. "SHIM: A Scheduling-Independent Concurrent Language for Embedded Systems". Talk or presentation, 8, November, 2006.

Abstract
Concurrent programming languages should be a good fit for embedded systems because they match the intrinsic parallelism of their architectures and environments. Unfortunately, typical concurrent programming formalisms are prone to races and nondeterminism, despite the presence of mechanisms such as monitors. We propose an alternative for describing such systems. Our SHIM (software/hardware integration medium) language, which uses Kahn networks with rendezvous communication at its heart, provides scheduling-independent concurrency in an asynchronous setting. It is a C-like imperative language extended with concurrency, inter-process communication, and exceptions. Compared to the SHIM we presented a year ago, this version of the language includes function calls, exceptions, and a novel way of treating function arguments as communication channels. We illustrate our programming model with examples including buffers and recursive pipelines. By construction, they are race-free. By providing a powerful, deterministic formalism for expressing systems, designing systems and verifying their correctness will become easier.

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Stephen A. Edwards. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/266.html"
    ><i>SHIM: A Scheduling-Independent Concurrent
    Language for Embedded Systems</i></a>, Talk or
    presentation,  8, November, 2006.
  • Plain text
    Stephen A. Edwards. "SHIM: A Scheduling-Independent
    Concurrent Language for Embedded Systems". Talk or
    presentation,  8, November, 2006.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Edwards06_SHIMSchedulingIndependentConcurrentLanguageForEmbedded,
        author = {Stephen A. Edwards},
        title = {SHIM: A Scheduling-Independent Concurrent Language
                  for Embedded Systems},
        day = {8},
        month = {November},
        year = {2006},
        abstract = {Concurrent programming languages should be a good
                  fit for embedded systems because they match the
                  intrinsic parallelism of their architectures and
                  environments. Unfortunately, typical concurrent
                  programming formalisms are prone to races and
                  nondeterminism, despite the presence of mechanisms
                  such as monitors. We propose an alternative for
                  describing such systems. Our SHIM
                  (software/hardware integration medium) language,
                  which uses Kahn networks with rendezvous
                  communication at its heart, provides
                  scheduling-independent concurrency in an
                  asynchronous setting. It is a C-like imperative
                  language extended with concurrency, inter-process
                  communication, and exceptions. Compared to the
                  SHIM we presented a year ago, this version of the
                  language includes function calls, exceptions, and
                  a novel way of treating function arguments as
                  communication channels. We illustrate our
                  programming model with examples including buffers
                  and recursive pipelines. By construction, they are
                  race-free. By providing a powerful, deterministic
                  formalism for expressing systems, designing
                  systems and verifying their correctness will
                  become easier. },
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/266.html}
    }
    

Posted by Christopher Brooks on 29 May 2007.
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