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Graphical System Design
David Fuller

Citation
David Fuller. "Graphical System Design". Talk or presentation, 26, September, 2007.

Abstract
The number of domain experts developing embedded systems has increased significantly in the last few years. Development tools must evolve to enable domain experts to analyze their problems rapidly, and then design, prototype and deploy solutions. We have found that graphical programming and graphical system modelling are very useful for this purpose and that with these graphical methodologies, end users can easily design and program systems composed of FPGAs and embedded processors for control and measurement applications.rnrnWe will present the lessons we have learned developing graphical design tools and we will share our vision of how such tools may evolve into higher-level engineering suites focused on the graphical creation of embedded and industrial systems. We will discuss the visual modelling of relationships between software and hardware resources, the relationship of structured dataflow to other Models of Computation, the limits of structured dataflow, how we plan to address these limits, and how we plan to model the relationships between time and order.rnrnTo demonstrate our results and future vision, we will use LabVIEW, which has evolved over the last twenty years into the most popular graphical programming language for Test and Measurement applications, and early prototypes of our next generation environment, recently developed in our labs.

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    David Fuller. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/355.html"
    ><i>Graphical System Design</i></a>,
    Talk or presentation,  26, September, 2007.
  • Plain text
    David Fuller. "Graphical System Design". Talk or
    presentation,  26, September, 2007.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Fuller07_GraphicalSystemDesign,
        author = {David Fuller},
        title = {Graphical System Design},
        day = {26},
        month = {September},
        year = {2007},
        abstract = {The number of domain experts developing embedded
                  systems has increased significantly in the last
                  few years. Development tools must evolve to enable
                  domain experts to analyze their problems rapidly,
                  and then design, prototype and deploy solutions.
                  We have found that graphical programming and
                  graphical system modelling are very useful for
                  this purpose and that with these graphical
                  methodologies, end users can easily design and
                  program systems composed of FPGAs and embedded
                  processors for control and measurement
                  applications.rnrnWe will present the lessons we
                  have learned developing graphical design tools and
                  we will share our vision of how such tools may
                  evolve into higher-level engineering suites
                  focused on the graphical creation of embedded and
                  industrial systems. We will discuss the visual
                  modelling of relationships between software and
                  hardware resources, the relationship of structured
                  dataflow to other Models of Computation, the
                  limits of structured dataflow, how we plan to
                  address these limits, and how we plan to model the
                  relationships between time and order.rnrnTo
                  demonstrate our results and future vision, we will
                  use LabVIEW, which has evolved over the last
                  twenty years into the most popular graphical
                  programming language for Test and Measurement
                  applications, and early prototypes of our next
                  generation environment, recently developed in our
                  labs.},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/355.html}
    }
    

Posted by Douglas Densmore on 14 Oct 2007.
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