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Communication Synthesis with Applications to On-Chip Communication and Building Automation Systems
Alessandro Pinto

Citation
Alessandro Pinto. "Communication Synthesis with Applications to On-Chip Communication and Building Automation Systems". Talk or presentation, 27, November, 2007.

Abstract

Integration is the next big challenge in Embedded System Design (ESD). The complexity of electronics, from chips to building automation systems, increases at each product generation, while time-to-market shrinks. To overcome the possible barriers coming from a linear increase of productivity, it has become common to assemble systems out of off-the shelf components. This approach to ESD brings up many issues that are not related to the components themselves but rather to the way in which they interact. The problem of interconnecting components correctly appears at all levels of abstraction. At the design entry level, each piece of the system is usually described with the model of computation that most naturally captures its behavior. When the entire system is put together, the interaction between different parts requires the definition of the interaction among heterogeneous models. At lower levels of abstraction, the problems reduces to the design of the actual communication architecture that allows the components to communicate. Correctness at this level is defined also with respect to performance metrics like latency, bandwidth and reliability.

Thus, given a collection of agents and the way in which they communicate (usually specified by a set of point-to-point communication requirements) the embedded system designer faces the problem of defining a communication structure such that the communication requirements are satisfied and the cost is minimized. This problem is not trivial considering the number of different ways in which the abstract point-to-point specification can be refined into a concrete communication structure. However, the flexibility provided by the plethora of communication technologies available today, is a great opportunity to “guarantee performance at minimum cost”: a motto for the embedded system community.

I will present our on-going research effort toward the development of an infrastructure for networked embedded systems. I will motivate our work using two design drivers: on-chip communication and building automation systems, and I will argue that the same theory can be applied independently from the specific application. Then, I will show how the theory has been used to develop a tool for the automatic design of communication structures and I will present some preliminary results. I will conclude with a list of research directions.

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Alessandro Pinto. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/378.html"
    ><i>Communication Synthesis with Applications to
    On-Chip Communication and Building Automation
    Systems</i></a>, Talk or presentation,  27,
    November, 2007.
  • Plain text
    Alessandro Pinto. "Communication Synthesis with
    Applications to On-Chip Communication and Building
    Automation Systems". Talk or presentation,  27,
    November, 2007.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Pinto07_CommunicationSynthesisWithApplicationsToOnChipCommunication,
        author = {Alessandro Pinto},
        title = {Communication Synthesis with Applications to
                  On-Chip Communication and Building Automation
                  Systems},
        day = {27},
        month = {November},
        year = {2007},
        abstract = {<p>Integration is the next big challenge in
                  Embedded System Design (ESD). The complexity of
                  electronics, from chips to building automation
                  systems, increases at each product generation,
                  while time-to-market shrinks. To overcome the
                  possible barriers coming from a linear increase of
                  productivity, it has become common to assemble
                  systems out of off-the shelf components. This
                  approach to ESD brings up many issues that are not
                  related to the components themselves but rather to
                  the way in which they interact. The problem of
                  interconnecting components correctly appears at
                  all levels of abstraction. At the design entry
                  level, each piece of the system is usually
                  described with the model of computation that most
                  naturally captures its behavior. When the entire
                  system is put together, the interaction between
                  different parts requires the definition of the
                  interaction among heterogeneous models. At lower
                  levels of abstraction, the problems reduces to the
                  design of the actual communication architecture
                  that allows the components to communicate.
                  Correctness at this level is defined also with
                  respect to performance metrics like latency,
                  bandwidth and reliability.</p> <p> Thus, given a
                  collection of agents and the way in which they
                  communicate (usually specified by a set of
                  point-to-point communication requirements) the
                  embedded system designer faces the problem of
                  defining a communication structure such that the
                  communication requirements are satisfied and the
                  cost is minimized. This problem is not trivial
                  considering the number of different ways in which
                  the abstract point-to-point specification can be
                  refined into a concrete communication structure.
                  However, the flexibility provided by the plethora
                  of communication technologies available today, is
                  a great opportunity to âguarantee performance at
                  minimum costâ: a motto for the embedded system
                  community.</p> <p> I will present our on-going
                  research effort toward the development of an
                  infrastructure for networked embedded systems. I
                  will motivate our work using two design drivers:
                  on-chip communication and building automation
                  systems, and I will argue that the same theory can
                  be applied independently from the specific
                  application. Then, I will show how the theory has
                  been used to develop a tool for the automatic
                  design of communication structures and I will
                  present some preliminary results. I will conclude
                  with a list of research directions.</p>},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/378.html}
    }
    

Posted by Douglas Densmore on 28 Nov 2007.
Groups: chess
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