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Mobile Millennium: using smartphones to monitor traffic in privacy aware environments
Alexandre Bayen

Citation
Alexandre Bayen. "Mobile Millennium: using smartphones to monitor traffic in privacy aware environments". Talk or presentation, 7, April, 2009.

Abstract
This talk describes how the mobile internet is changing the face of traffic monitoring at a rapid pace. In the last five years, cellular phone technology has bypassed several attempts to construct dedicated infrastructure systems to monitor traffic. Today, GPS equipped smartphones are progressively morphing into an ubiquitous traffic monitoring system, with the potential to provide information almost everywhere in the transportation network. Traffic information systems of this type are one of the first instantiations of participatory sensing for large scale cyberphysical infrastructure systems. However, while mobile device technology is very promising, fundamental challenges remain to be solved to use it to its full extent, in particular in the fields of modeling and data assimilation. The talk will present a new system, called Mobile Millennium, launched recently by UC Berkeley, Nokia and Navteq, in which the driving public in Northern California can freely download software into their GPS equiped smartphones, enabling them to view traffic in real time and become probe vehicles themselves. The smartphone data is collected in a privacy-by-design environment, using spatially aware sampling. Using data assimilation, the probe data is fused with existing sensor data, to provide real time estimates of traffic. The data assimilation scheme relies on the appropriate use of Ensemble Kalman Filtering on networked hyperbolic first order partial differential equations, and the construction of lower-semicontinuous viability solutions to Moskowitz Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Results from experimental deployments in California and New York will be presented, as well as preliminary results from a pilot field operational test in California, which is planned to reach 10,000 probe vehicles in a few months. More information at: http://www.traffic.berkeley.edu

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Alexandre Bayen. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/543.html"
    ><i>Mobile Millennium: using smartphones to monitor
    traffic in privacy aware environments</i></a>,
    Talk or presentation,  7, April, 2009.
  • Plain text
    Alexandre Bayen. "Mobile Millennium: using smartphones
    to monitor traffic in privacy aware environments". Talk
    or presentation,  7, April, 2009.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Bayen09_MobileMillenniumUsingSmartphonesToMonitorTrafficInPrivacy,
        author = {Alexandre Bayen},
        title = {Mobile Millennium: using smartphones to monitor
                  traffic in privacy aware environments},
        day = {7},
        month = {April},
        year = {2009},
        abstract = {This talk describes how the mobile internet is
                  changing the face of traffic monitoring at a rapid
                  pace. In the last five years, cellular phone
                  technology has bypassed several attempts to
                  construct dedicated infrastructure systems to
                  monitor traffic. Today, GPS equipped smartphones
                  are progressively morphing into an ubiquitous
                  traffic monitoring system, with the potential to
                  provide information almost everywhere in the
                  transportation network. Traffic information
                  systems of this type are one of the first
                  instantiations of participatory sensing for large
                  scale cyberphysical infrastructure systems.
                  However, while mobile device technology is very
                  promising, fundamental challenges remain to be
                  solved to use it to its full extent, in particular
                  in the fields of modeling and data assimilation.
                  The talk will present a new system, called Mobile
                  Millennium, launched recently by UC Berkeley,
                  Nokia and Navteq, in which the driving public in
                  Northern California can freely download software
                  into their GPS equiped smartphones, enabling them
                  to view traffic in real time and become probe
                  vehicles themselves. The smartphone data is
                  collected in a privacy-by-design environment,
                  using spatially aware sampling. Using data
                  assimilation, the probe data is fused with
                  existing sensor data, to provide real time
                  estimates of traffic. The data assimilation scheme
                  relies on the appropriate use of Ensemble Kalman
                  Filtering on networked hyperbolic first order
                  partial differential equations, and the
                  construction of lower-semicontinuous viability
                  solutions to Moskowitz Hamilton-Jacobi equations.
                  Results from experimental deployments in
                  California and New York will be presented, as well
                  as preliminary results from a pilot field
                  operational test in California, which is planned
                  to reach 10,000 probe vehicles in a few months.
                  More information at:
                  http://www.traffic.berkeley.edu},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/543.html}
    }
    

Posted by Hiren Patel on 9 Apr 2009.
Groups: chess
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