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Embedded system design with the Polychronous paradigm
Albert Benveniste

Citation
Albert Benveniste. "Embedded system design with the Polychronous paradigm". Talk or presentation, 14, April, 2009.

Abstract
While the term of synchronous languages has largely been responsible for the success of the concept, it also has resulted in misleadings regarding what they are. In fact, the synchronous paradigm has much wider applicability and is much more flexible than its popular "round based MoC" is supposed to make it. This is why Paul Le Guernic has decided to promote the (less overloaded but also more cryptic) term of Polychrony instead. But keep cool: this talk is indeed about synchronous languages. It will just be a somehow heterodox view of them. Instead of highlighting simplicity (following Paul Caspi and Nicolas Halbwachs), I shall highlight power and flexibility. I do not claim I shall present the right view, but am sure this view will complement in a useful way everything you always wanted to know about synchronous languages...

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Albert Benveniste. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/574.html"
    ><i>Embedded system design with the Polychronous
    paradigm</i></a>, Talk or presentation,  14,
    April, 2009.
  • Plain text
    Albert Benveniste. "Embedded system design with the
    Polychronous paradigm". Talk or presentation,  14,
    April, 2009.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Benveniste09_EmbeddedSystemDesignWithPolychronousParadigm,
        author = {Albert Benveniste},
        title = {Embedded system design with the Polychronous
                  paradigm},
        day = {14},
        month = {April},
        year = {2009},
        abstract = {While the term of synchronous languages has
                  largely been responsible for the success of the
                  concept, it also has resulted in misleadings
                  regarding what they are. In fact, the synchronous
                  paradigm has much wider applicability and is much
                  more flexible than its popular "round based MoC"
                  is supposed to make it. This is why Paul Le
                  Guernic has decided to promote the (less
                  overloaded but also more cryptic) term of
                  Polychrony instead. But keep cool: this talk is
                  indeed about synchronous languages. It will just
                  be a somehow heterodox view of them. Instead of
                  highlighting simplicity (following Paul Caspi and
                  Nicolas Halbwachs), I shall highlight power and
                  flexibility. I do not claim I shall present the
                  right view, but am sure this view will complement
                  in a useful way everything you always wanted to
                  know about synchronous languages...},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/574.html}
    }
    

Posted by Hiren Patel on 19 Apr 2009.
Groups: chess
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