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Causality Interfaces and Compositional Causality Analysis
Edward A. Lee, Haiyang Zheng, Ye Zhou

Citation
Edward A. Lee, Haiyang Zheng, Ye Zhou. "Causality Interfaces and Compositional Causality Analysis". Foundations of Interface Technologies (FIT), CONCUR 2005, ENTCS TBD, August, 2005.

Abstract
In this paper, we consider concurrent models of computation where ?actors? (components that are in charge of their own actions) communicate by exchanging messages. The interfaces of actors principally consist of ?ports,? which mediate the exchange of messages. Actor-oriented architectures contrast with and complement object-oriented models by emphasizing the exchange of data between concurrent components rather than transfer of control. Examples of such models of computation include the classical actor model, synchronous languages, dataflow models, and discrete-event models. Many of these models of computation benefit considerably from having access to causality information about the components. This paper augments the interfaces of such components to include such causality information. It shows how this causality information can be algebraically composed so that compositions of components acquire causality interfaces that are inferred from their components and the interconnections. We illustrate the use of these causality interfaces to statically analyze discrete-event models for uniqueness of behaviors, synchronous models for causality loops, and dataflow models for schedulability.

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Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Edward A. Lee, Haiyang Zheng, Ye Zhou. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/59.html"
    >Causality Interfaces and Compositional Causality
    Analysis</a>, Foundations of Interface Technologies
    (FIT), CONCUR 2005, ENTCS TBD, August, 2005.
  • Plain text
    Edward A. Lee, Haiyang Zheng, Ye Zhou. "Causality
    Interfaces and Compositional Causality Analysis".
    Foundations of Interface Technologies (FIT), CONCUR 2005,
    ENTCS TBD, August, 2005.
  • BibTeX
    @inproceedings{LeeZhengZhou05_CausalityInterfacesCompositionalCausalityAnalysis,
        author = {Edward A. Lee and Haiyang Zheng and Ye Zhou},
        title = {Causality Interfaces and Compositional Causality
                  Analysis},
        booktitle = {Foundations of Interface Technologies (FIT)},
        organization = {CONCUR 2005, ENTCS TBD},
        month = {August},
        year = {2005},
        abstract = {In this paper, we consider concurrent models of
                  computation where ?actors? (components that are in
                  charge of their own actions) communicate by
                  exchanging messages. The interfaces of actors
                  principally consist of ?ports,? which mediate the
                  exchange of messages. Actor-oriented architectures
                  contrast with and complement object-oriented
                  models by emphasizing the exchange of data between
                  concurrent components rather than transfer of
                  control. Examples of such models of computation
                  include the classical actor model, synchronous
                  languages, dataflow models, and discrete-event
                  models. Many of these models of computation
                  benefit considerably from having access to
                  causality information about the components. This
                  paper augments the interfaces of such components
                  to include such causality information. It shows
                  how this causality information can be
                  algebraically composed so that compositions of
                  components acquire causality interfaces that are
                  inferred from their components and the
                  interconnections. We illustrate the use of these
                  causality interfaces to statically analyze
                  discrete-event models for uniqueness of behaviors,
                  synchronous models for causality loops, and
                  dataflow models for schedulability.},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/59.html}
    }
    

Posted by Mary Stewart on 5 May 2006.
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