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Relaxing the Synchronous Approach for Mixed-Criticality Systems
Eugene Yip, Matthew Kuo, Partha Roop, David Broman

Citation
Eugene Yip, Matthew Kuo, Partha Roop, David Broman. "Relaxing the Synchronous Approach for Mixed-Criticality Systems". Proceedings of the 20th IEEE Real-Time and Embedded Technology and Application Symposium (RTAS), April, 2014.

Abstract
Synchronous languages are widely used to design safety-critical embedded systems. These languages are based on the synchrony hypothesis, asserting that all tasks must complete instantaneously at each logical time step. This assertion is, however, unsuitable for the design of mixed-criticality systems, where some tasks can tolerate missed deadlines. This paper proposes a novel extension to the synchronous approach for supporting three levels of task criticality: life, mission, and non-critical. We achieve this by relaxing the synchrony hypothesis to allow tasks that can tolerate bounded or unbounded deadline misses. We address the issue of task communication between multi-rate, mixed-criticality tasks, and propose a deterministic lossless communication model. To maximize system utilization, we present a hybrid static and dynamic scheduling approach that executes schedulable tasks during slack time. Extensive benchmarking shows that our approach can schedule up to 15% more task sets and achieve an average of 5.38% better system utilization than the Early-Release EDF (ER-EDF) approach. Tasks are scheduled fairer under our approach and achieve consistently higher execution frequencies, but require more preemptions.

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Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Eugene Yip, Matthew Kuo, Partha Roop, David Broman. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/1050.html"
    >Relaxing the Synchronous Approach for Mixed-Criticality
    Systems</a>, Proceedings of the 20th IEEE Real-Time
    and Embedded Technology and Application Symposium (RTAS),
    April, 2014.
  • Plain text
    Eugene Yip, Matthew Kuo, Partha Roop, David Broman.
    "Relaxing the Synchronous Approach for
    Mixed-Criticality Systems". Proceedings of the 20th
    IEEE Real-Time and Embedded Technology and Application
    Symposium (RTAS), April, 2014.
  • BibTeX
    @inproceedings{YipKuoRoopBroman14_RelaxingSynchronousApproachForMixedCriticalitySystems,
        author = {Eugene Yip and Matthew Kuo and Partha Roop and
                  David Broman},
        title = {Relaxing the Synchronous Approach for
                  Mixed-Criticality Systems},
        booktitle = {Proceedings of the 20th IEEE Real-Time and
                  Embedded Technology and Application Symposium
                  (RTAS)},
        month = {April},
        year = {2014},
        abstract = {Synchronous languages are widely used to design
                  safety-critical embedded systems. These languages
                  are based on the synchrony hypothesis, asserting
                  that all tasks must complete instantaneously at
                  each logical time step. This assertion is,
                  however, unsuitable for the design of
                  mixed-criticality systems, where some tasks can
                  tolerate missed deadlines. This paper proposes a
                  novel extension to the synchronous approach for
                  supporting three levels of task criticality: life,
                  mission, and non-critical. We achieve this by
                  relaxing the synchrony hypothesis to allow tasks
                  that can tolerate bounded or unbounded deadline
                  misses. We address the issue of task communication
                  between multi-rate, mixed-criticality tasks, and
                  propose a deterministic lossless communication
                  model. To maximize system utilization, we present
                  a hybrid static and dynamic scheduling approach
                  that executes schedulable tasks during slack time.
                  Extensive benchmarking shows that our approach can
                  schedule up to 15% more task sets and achieve an
                  average of 5.38% better system utilization than
                  the Early-Release EDF (ER-EDF) approach. Tasks are
                  scheduled fairer under our approach and achieve
                  consistently higher execution frequencies, but
                  require more preemptions.},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/1050.html}
    }
    

Posted by David Broman on 15 Jan 2014.
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