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Zelus, a synchronous language with Ordinary Differential Equations
Marc Pouzet

Citation
Marc Pouzet. "Zelus, a synchronous language with Ordinary Differential Equations". Talk or presentation, 11, February, 2014.

Abstract
Zelus is a new programming language for modeling systems that mix discrete logical time and continuous time behaviors. From a user's perspective, its main originality is to extend an existing Lustre-like synchronous language with Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). The extension is conservative: any synchronous program expressed as data-flow equations and hierarchical automata can be composed arbitrarily with ODEs in the same source code. A dedicated type system and causality analysis ensure that all discrete changes are aligned with zero-crossing events so that no side effects or discontinuities occur during integration. Programs are statically scheduled and translated into sequential code by a sequence of source-to-source transformations and the final code is paired with an off-the-shelf numeric solver. During the talk, I will focus on a recent work showing some scheduling issues in the Simulink compiler and present a Lustre inspired type-based causality analysis to detect instantaneous loops. This is joint work with Albert Benveniste, Benoit Caillaud, Timothy Bourke and Bruno Pagano.

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Marc Pouzet. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/1059.html"
    ><i>Zelus, a synchronous language with Ordinary
    Differential Equations</i></a>, Talk or
    presentation,  11, February, 2014.
  • Plain text
    Marc Pouzet. "Zelus, a synchronous language with
    Ordinary Differential Equations". Talk or presentation,
     11, February, 2014.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Pouzet14_ZelusSynchronousLanguageWithOrdinaryDifferentialEquations,
        author = {Marc Pouzet},
        title = {Zelus, a synchronous language with Ordinary
                  Differential Equations},
        day = {11},
        month = {February},
        year = {2014},
        abstract = {Zelus is a new programming language for modeling
                  systems that mix discrete logical time and
                  continuous time behaviors. From a user's
                  perspective, its main originality is to extend an
                  existing Lustre-like synchronous language with
                  Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs). The
                  extension is conservative: any synchronous program
                  expressed as data-flow equations and hierarchical
                  automata can be composed arbitrarily with ODEs in
                  the same source code. A dedicated type system and
                  causality analysis ensure that all discrete
                  changes are aligned with zero-crossing events so
                  that no side effects or discontinuities occur
                  during integration. Programs are statically
                  scheduled and translated into sequential code by a
                  sequence of source-to-source transformations and
                  the final code is paired with an off-the-shelf
                  numeric solver. During the talk, I will focus on a
                  recent work showing some scheduling issues in the
                  Simulink compiler and present a Lustre inspired
                  type-based causality analysis to detect
                  instantaneous loops. This is joint work with
                  Albert Benveniste, Benoit Caillaud, Timothy Bourke
                  and Bruno Pagano.},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/1059.html}
    }
    

Posted by Armin Wasicek on 22 Feb 2014.
Groups: chessworkshop
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