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Balancing Expressiveness and Analyzability in Stream Formalisms
Edward A. Lee

Citation
Edward A. Lee. "Balancing Expressiveness and Analyzability in Stream Formalisms". Talk or presentation, 7, July, 2008; Invited Talk, Exploiting Concurrency: Efficiency and Correctness (EC2) A Workshop, in conjunction with the 20th International Conference on Computer aided Verification (CAV 2008) Princeton, NJ July 7 and 8, 2008.

Abstract
Streaming models of computation are regaining attention among researchers seeking effective ways to express and exploit concurrency. In this talk I will review a long history of dataflow variants, specifically analyzing the tradeoff between expressiveness and analyzability. In particular, I will argue that using conditional routing and nondeterminate merge of data tokens as a substitute for control flow is inelegant (analogous to unstructured goto) and leads to formalisms that are unanalyzable. Languages such as LabVIEW and StreamIT offer more elegant structured dataflow mechanisms. These structured mechanisms can be extended to improve expressiveness by combining dataflow with state machines and with imperative programs, and by supporting recursion. As expressiveness improves, however, analyzability degrades, and effectively exploiting concurrency for parallel execution becomes more challenging.

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Edward A. Lee. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/470.html"
    ><i>Balancing Expressiveness and Analyzability in
    Stream Formalisms</i></a>, Talk or presentation,
     7, July, 2008; Invited Talk, Exploiting Concurrency:
    Efficiency and Correctness (EC2)
    
    A Workshop, in
    conjunction with the 20th International Conference on
    Computer aided Verification (CAV 2008)
    
    Princeton, NJ July
    7 and 8, 2008.
  • Plain text
    Edward A. Lee. "Balancing Expressiveness and
    Analyzability in Stream Formalisms". Talk or
    presentation,  7, July, 2008; Invited Talk, Exploiting
    Concurrency: Efficiency and Correctness (EC2)
    
    A Workshop,
    in conjunction with the 20th International Conference on
    Computer aided Verification (CAV 2008)
    
    Princeton, NJ July
    7 and 8, 2008.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Lee08_BalancingExpressivenessAnalyzabilityInStreamFormalisms,
        author = {Edward A. Lee},
        title = {Balancing Expressiveness and Analyzability in
                  Stream Formalisms},
        day = {7},
        month = {July},
        year = {2008},
        note = {Invited Talk, Exploiting Concurrency: Efficiency
                  and Correctness (EC2)
    
    A Workshop, in
                  conjunction with the 20th International Conference
                  on Computer aided Verification (CAV 2008)
    
                  Princeton, NJ July 7 and 8, 2008},
        abstract = {Streaming models of computation are regaining
                  attention among researchers seeking effective ways
                  to express and exploit concurrency. In this talk I
                  will review a long history of dataflow variants,
                  specifically analyzing the tradeoff between
                  expressiveness and analyzability. In particular, I
                  will argue that using conditional routing and
                  nondeterminate merge of data tokens as a
                  substitute for control flow is inelegant
                  (analogous to unstructured goto) and leads to
                  formalisms that are unanalyzable. Languages such
                  as LabVIEW and StreamIT offer more elegant
                  structured dataflow mechanisms. These structured
                  mechanisms can be extended to improve
                  expressiveness by combining dataflow with state
                  machines and with imperative programs, and by
                  supporting recursion. As expressiveness improves,
                  however, analyzability degrades, and effectively
                  exploiting concurrency for parallel execution
                  becomes more challenging. },
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/470.html}
    }
    

Posted by Mary Stewart on 7 Jul 2008.
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