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Short-term Memory for Self-collecting Mutators
Christoph Kirsch

Citation
Christoph Kirsch. "Short-term Memory for Self-collecting Mutators". Talk or presentation, 7, September, 2010.

Abstract
We propose a new memory model for heap management, called short-term memory, and concurrent implementations of short-term memory for Java and C, called self-collecting mutators. In short-term memory, objects on the heap expire after a finite amount of time, which makes deallocation unnecessary. Self-collecting mutators requires programmer support to control the progress of time and thereby enable reclaiming the memory of expired objects. We informally describe a simple translation scheme for porting existing programs to self-collecting mutators. As shown by our experimental results on several benchmarks, self-collecting mutators performs competitively with garbage-collected and explicitly managed systems. Unlike garbage-collected systems, self-collecting mutators does not introduce pause times and provide constant execution time of all operations, independent of the number of reachable objects, and constant short-term memory consumption after a steady state has been reached. Self-collecting mutators can be linked against any unmodified C code introducing a per-object space overhead of one word and negligible runtime overhead. Short-term memory may then be used to remove explicit deallocation of some but not necessarily all objects.

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Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Christoph Kirsch. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/701.html"
    ><i>Short-term Memory for Self-collecting
    Mutators</i></a>, Talk or presentation,  7,
    September, 2010.
  • Plain text
    Christoph Kirsch. "Short-term Memory for
    Self-collecting Mutators". Talk or presentation,  7,
    September, 2010.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Kirsch10_ShorttermMemoryForSelfcollectingMutators,
        author = {Christoph Kirsch},
        title = {Short-term Memory for Self-collecting Mutators},
        day = {7},
        month = {September},
        year = {2010},
        abstract = {We propose a new memory model for heap management,
                  called short-term memory, and concurrent
                  implementations of short-term memory for Java and
                  C, called self-collecting mutators. In short-term
                  memory, objects on the heap expire after a finite
                  amount of time, which makes deallocation
                  unnecessary. Self-collecting mutators requires
                  programmer support to control the progress of time
                  and thereby enable reclaiming the memory of
                  expired objects. We informally describe a simple
                  translation scheme for porting existing programs
                  to self-collecting mutators. As shown by our
                  experimental results on several benchmarks,
                  self-collecting mutators performs competitively
                  with garbage-collected and explicitly managed
                  systems. Unlike garbage-collected systems,
                  self-collecting mutators does not introduce pause
                  times and provide constant execution time of all
                  operations, independent of the number of reachable
                  objects, and constant short-term memory
                  consumption after a steady state has been reached.
                  Self-collecting mutators can be linked against any
                  unmodified C code introducing a per-object space
                  overhead of one word and negligible runtime
                  overhead. Short-term memory may then be used to
                  remove explicit deallocation of some but not
                  necessarily all objects. },
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/701.html}
    }
    

Posted by Jan Reineke on 7 Sep 2010.
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