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Exploring Models of Computation with Ptolemy II
Christopher Brooks, Edward A. Lee, Stavros Tripakis

Citation
Christopher Brooks, Edward A. Lee, Stavros Tripakis. "Exploring Models of Computation with Ptolemy II". Talk or presentation, 24, October, 2010; A tutorial presented at ESWeek 2010 in Scottsdale, AZ.

Abstract
The Ptolemy project studies modeling, simulation, and design of concurrent, real-time, embedded systems. The focus is on assembly of concurrent components. The key underlying principle in the project is the use of well-defined models of computation that govern the interaction between components. A major problem area being addressed is the use of heterogeneous mixtures of models of computation. Ptolemy II takes a component view of design, in that models are constructed as a set of interacting components. A model of computation governs the semantics of the interaction, and thus imposes an execution-time discipline. Ptolemy II has implementations of many models of computation including Synchronous Data Flow, Kahn Process Networks, Discrete Event, Continuous Time, Synchronous/ Reactive and Modal Models This hands-on tutorial explores how these models of computation are implemented in Ptolemy II and how to create new models of computation such as a “non-dogmatic” Process Networks example and a left-to-right execution policy example.

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Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Christopher Brooks, Edward A. Lee, Stavros Tripakis. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/712.html"
    ><i>Exploring Models of Computation with Ptolemy
    II</i></a>, Talk or presentation,  24, October,
    2010; A tutorial presented at ESWeek 2010 in Scottsdale, AZ.
  • Plain text
    Christopher Brooks, Edward A. Lee, Stavros Tripakis.
    "Exploring Models of Computation with Ptolemy II".
    Talk or presentation,  24, October, 2010; A tutorial
    presented at ESWeek 2010 in Scottsdale, AZ.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{BrooksLeeTripakis10_ExploringModelsOfComputationWithPtolemyII,
        author = {Christopher Brooks and Edward A. Lee and Stavros
                  Tripakis},
        title = {Exploring Models of Computation with Ptolemy II},
        day = {24},
        month = {October},
        year = {2010},
        note = {A tutorial presented at ESWeek 2010 in Scottsdale,
                  AZ},
        abstract = {The Ptolemy project studies modeling, simulation,
                  and design of concurrent, real-time, embedded
                  systems. The focus is on assembly of concurrent
                  components. The key underlying principle in the
                  project is the use of well-defined models of
                  computation that govern the interaction between
                  components. A major problem area being addressed
                  is the use of heterogeneous mixtures of models of
                  computation. Ptolemy II takes a component view of
                  design, in that models are constructed as a set of
                  interacting components. A model of computation
                  governs the semantics of the interaction, and thus
                  imposes an execution-time discipline. Ptolemy II
                  has implementations of many models of computation
                  including Synchronous Data Flow, Kahn Process
                  Networks, Discrete Event, Continuous Time,
                  Synchronous/ Reactive and Modal Models This
                  hands-on tutorial explores how these models of
                  computation are implemented in Ptolemy II and how
                  to create new models of computation such as a
                  ânon-dogmaticâ Process Networks example and a
                  left-to-right execution policy example.},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/712.html}
    }
    

Posted by Christopher Brooks on 28 Oct 2010.
Groups: actionwebs ptolemy
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