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Computing Needs Time
Edward A. Lee

Citation
Edward A. Lee. "Computing Needs Time". Talk or presentation, 6, December, 2010; Presented at the Distinguished Systems Speakers Series, Purdue University.

Abstract
Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are integrations of computation and physical processes. Embedded computers and networks monitor and control the physical processes, usually with feedback loops where physical processes affect computations and vice versa. The prevailing abstractions used in computing, however, do not mesh well with the physical world. Most critically, software systems speak about the passage of time only very indirectly and in on-compositional ways. This talk examines the obstacles in software technologies that are impeding progress, and in particular raises the question of whether today's computing and networking technologies provide an adequate foundation for CPS. It argues that it will not be sufficient to improve design processes, raise the level of abstraction, or verify (formally or otherwise) designs that are built on today's abstractions. To realize the full potential of CPS, we will have to rebuild software abstractions. These abstractions will have to embrace physical dynamics and computation in a unified way. This talk will discuss research challenges and potential solutions.

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Edward A. Lee. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/796.html"
    ><i>Computing Needs Time</i></a>, Talk
    or presentation,  6, December, 2010; Presented at the
    Distinguished Systems Speakers Series, Purdue University.
  • Plain text
    Edward A. Lee. "Computing Needs Time". Talk or
    presentation,  6, December, 2010; Presented at the
    Distinguished Systems Speakers Series, Purdue University.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Lee10_ComputingNeedsTime,
        author = {Edward A. Lee},
        title = {Computing Needs Time},
        day = {6},
        month = {December},
        year = {2010},
        note = {Presented at the Distinguished Systems Speakers
                  Series, Purdue University},
        abstract = {Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are integrations of
                  computation and physical processes. Embedded
                  computers and networks monitor and control the
                  physical processes, usually with feedback loops
                  where physical processes affect computations and
                  vice versa. The prevailing abstractions used in
                  computing, however, do not mesh well with the
                  physical world. Most critically, software systems
                  speak about the passage of time only very
                  indirectly and in on-compositional ways. This talk
                  examines the obstacles in software technologies
                  that are impeding progress, and in particular
                  raises the question of whether today's computing
                  and networking technologies provide an adequate
                  foundation for CPS. It argues that it will not be
                  sufficient to improve design processes, raise the
                  level of abstraction, or verify (formally or
                  otherwise) designs that are built on today's
                  abstractions. To realize the full potential of
                  CPS, we will have to rebuild software
                  abstractions. These abstractions will have to
                  embrace physical dynamics and computation in a
                  unified way. This talk will discuss research
                  challenges and potential solutions.},
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/796.html}
    }
    

Posted by Christopher Brooks on 22 Dec 2010.
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