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Heterogeneous Actor Models
Edward A. Lee

Citation
Edward A. Lee. "Heterogeneous Actor Models". Talk or presentation, 10, October, 2011; Invited Roadmap Talk, EMSOFT
Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract
Complex systems demand diversity in the modeling mechanisms. We see this very clearly with cyber-physical systems (CPS), which combine computing and networking with physical dynamics, and hence require model combinations that integrate dynamics described using differential equations with models of software. We also see it in applications where timed interactions with components are combined with conventional algorithmic computations, such as in networked computer games. We even see it in traditional software systems when we have concurrent interactions between algorithmic components.

One way to deal with a diversity of requirements is to create very flexible modeling frameworks that can be adapted to cover the field of interest. The downside of this approach is a weakening of the semantics of the modeling frameworks that compromises interoperability, understandability, and analyzability of the models. An alternative approach is to embrace heterogeneity and to provide mechanisms for a diversity of models to interact.

In this talk, I will describe an approach that achieves such interaction between diverse models using a concept that we call "abstract semantics." An abstract semantics is a deliberately incomplete semantics that cannot by itself define a useful modeling framework. It instead focuses on the interactions between diverse models, reducing the nature of those interactions to a minimum that achieves a well-defined composition. I will illustrate how such an abstract semantics can handle many heterogeneous models that are built today (such as Statecharts, which combine state machines with synchronous concurrent models, hybrid systems, which combine state machines with differential equations, process networks, which combine imperative programs with message passing concurrency, etc.). I will also show how it handles combinations that are not readily available in modeling tools today. I will illustrate these combinations with examples prototyped in Ptolemy II.

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    Edward A. Lee. <a
    href="http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/866.html"
    ><i>Heterogeneous Actor Models</i></a>,
    Talk or presentation,  10, October, 2011; <b>Invited
    Roadmap Talk</b>, <i>EMSOFT</i><br>
    Taipei, Taiwan.
  • Plain text
    Edward A. Lee. "Heterogeneous Actor Models". Talk
    or presentation,  10, October, 2011; <b>Invited
    Roadmap Talk</b>, <i>EMSOFT</i><br>
    Taipei, Taiwan.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Lee11_HeterogeneousActorModels,
        author = {Edward A. Lee},
        title = {Heterogeneous Actor Models},
        day = {10},
        month = {October},
        year = {2011},
        note = {<b>Invited Roadmap Talk</b>, <i>EMSOFT</i><br>
                  Taipei, Taiwan},
        abstract = {Complex systems demand diversity in the modeling
                  mechanisms. We see this very clearly with
                  cyber-physical systems (CPS), which combine
                  computing and networking with physical dynamics,
                  and hence require model combinations that
                  integrate dynamics described using differential
                  equations with models of software. We also see it
                  in applications where timed interactions with
                  components are combined with conventional
                  algorithmic computations, such as in networked
                  computer games. We even see it in traditional
                  software systems when we have concurrent
                  interactions between algorithmic components.
                  <p>One way to deal with a diversity of
                  requirements is to create very flexible modeling
                  frameworks that can be adapted to cover the field
                  of interest. The downside of this approach is a
                  weakening of the semantics of the modeling
                  frameworks that compromises interoperability,
                  understandability, and analyzability of the
                  models. An alternative approach is to embrace
                  heterogeneity and to provide mechanisms for a
                  diversity of models to interact. <p>In this talk,
                  I will describe an approach that achieves such
                  interaction between diverse models using a concept
                  that we call "abstract semantics." An abstract
                  semantics is a deliberately incomplete semantics
                  that cannot by itself define a useful modeling
                  framework. It instead focuses on the interactions
                  between diverse models, reducing the nature of
                  those interactions to a minimum that achieves a
                  well-defined composition. I will illustrate how
                  such an abstract semantics can handle many
                  heterogeneous models that are built today (such as
                  Statecharts, which combine state machines with
                  synchronous concurrent models, hybrid systems,
                  which combine state machines with differential
                  equations, process networks, which combine
                  imperative programs with message passing
                  concurrency, etc.). I will also show how it
                  handles combinations that are not readily
                  available in modeling tools today. I will
                  illustrate these combinations with examples
                  prototyped in Ptolemy II. },
        URL = {http://chess.eecs.berkeley.edu/pubs/866.html}
    }
    

Posted by Mary Stewart on 26 Oct 2011.
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